Wooster Selected as the Best “Hidden Gem” in Higher Education

In survey taken by Independent Educational Consultants, Wooster is top school singled out

WOOSTER, Ohio – The College of Wooster has emerged as the best known “hidden gem” in higher education, that according to results from a survey taken by more than 160 Independent Educational Consultants (IEC). The survey, a series of questions designed to learn about college admissions trends, was conducted by Applerouth Tutoring Services, a test preparation organization dedicated to helping students get into their schools of choice since 2001.

IEC’s were only asked to single out individual schools by one question on the survey—name up to three “hidden gems” you wished more families would consider—and Wooster was the most common answer, finishing ahead of the likes of the University of Denver, the University of Rochester, and Trinity College.

“This is more evidence that Wooster’s already exceptional reputation is growing. This is a list of really high-quality schools. It’s pretty impressive knowing that counselors recommend Wooster most often,” said Scott Friedhoff, vice president for enrollment and college relations. “And, these counselors work with students from around the globe – another reason for Wooster’s state-leading international presence.”

Friedhoff noted that scores of IEC’s have visited Wooster’s campus in recent years, and by these results, they’ve obviously come away impressed with the commitment to mentored research, which is capped by Independent Study, a program in which each and every student completes a piece of original research, scholarship, or creative expression, as well as its academic and career support, distinctive spirit, and vibrant local community.

Additional interesting results from Applerouth’s survey included 93% of IEC’s reporting that families put too much emphasis on school “brand names” when choosing where to apply, and when IEC clients are choosing a school “fit” is of paramount importance as academic programs aligned with student interests (50%) ranked ahead of prestige (22%) and cost (6%) in the most important factor for their families.